What to eat if you get constipated


YES. I’m going there.

Many clients (young and old alike) come to me with bathroom distress, so I figured I would share the scoop on poop. WARNING. This may get graphic.

Constipation is the opposite of diarrhea - it's when stool tends to stick around longer than necessary. Often it's drier, lumpier, and harder than normal, and may be difficult to pass.

Constipation often comes along with abdominal pain and bloating. And can be common in people with certain gut issues, like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), hormone imbalances, anxiety and inflammation.

About 14-24% of adults experience constipation. Constipation becomes chronic when it happens at least three times per week for three months.

Constipation can be caused by diet or stress, and even changes to our daily routine. Sometimes the culprit is a medical condition or medications. And sometimes there can be a structural problem with the gut. It’s important to figure out WHY you’re not having regular movements.


Constipation is a sign of poor gut health and can be connected to various things:

  • Medication

  • Dehydration

  • Lack of essential fatty acids in your diet

  • Not enough fibre in your diet

  • Food sensitivities and other foods that can cause inflammation in the gut

  • A diet high in sugar or refined flours

  • A nervous system that is out of whack (hello stress hormones)

  • Bacterial imbalances (which is caused constipation PLUS all of the above)

Whether you know why or not, there are some things you can do if you get constipated.

1 - Eat more fibre

Your mother probably told you to eat more prunes (or figs and dates) if you get constipated.

Why is that?

It comes down to fibre.

Dietary fibre is a type of plant-based carbohydrate that we can’t digest and absorb. Unlike cows, humans don’t have the digestive enzymes to break it down. And that’s a good thing!

Even though we can’t digest it ourselves, fibre is very important for our gut health for two reasons.

First, fibre helps to push things through our system (and out the other end).

Second, fibre is an important food for feeding the friendly microbes in our gut.

There are two kinds of fibre: soluble and insoluble.

Soluble fibre dissolves in water to make a gel-like consistency. It can soften and bulk up the stool; this is the kind of fibre that you want to focus on for helping with constipation. Soluble fibre is found in legumes (beans, peas, lentils), fruit (apples, bananas, berries, citrus, pears, etc.), vegetables (broccoli, carrots, spinach, etc.), and grains like oats.

Psyllium is a soluble non-fermenting fibre from corn husks. It’s been shown to help soften stools and produce a laxative effect.

Insoluble fibre, on the other hand, holds onto water and can help to push things through the gut and get things moving. It's the kind found in the skins and seeds of fruits and vegetables like asparagus, broccoli, celery, zucchini, as well as the skins of apples, pears, and potatoes.

It’s recommended that adults consume between 20-35 grams of fibre per day. I recommend upwards of 40 grams daily.

If you are going to increase your fibre intake, make sure to do it gradually. Radically changing your diet can make things worse!

And, it’s also very important to combine increased fibre intake with my next point to drink more fluids.

NOTE: There is conflicting evidence on how fibre affects constipation. In some cases, less insoluble fibre may be better, especially if you have certain digestive issues or are in a flare. So, make sure you’re monitoring how your diet affects your gut health and act accordingly. And don’t be afraid to see your healthcare provider when necessary.

2 - Drink more fluids

Since constipated stools are hard and dry, drinking more fluids can help keep everything hydrated and moist. This is especially true when trying to maintain a healthy gut every day, rather than when trying to deal with the problem of constipation after it has started.

And it doesn't only have to be water - watery foods like soups, and some fruits and vegetables can also contribute to your fluid intake.

Always ensure you're well hydrated, and drinking according to thirst; this is recommended for gut health as well as overall health. This is particularly true if you exercise or have a job that keeps you physically out and about.


Why do fluids matter? Well, your digestive system is considered a "less important organ" than say your heart, brain or lungs. Water is involved with thousands of metabolic reactions in the body. If you are dehydrated, the body will prioritize and allocate water to more important systems so you stay alive.

3 - Probiotics

Probiotics are beneficial microbes that come in fermented foods and supplements. They have a number of effects on gut health and constipation. They affect gut transit time (how fast food goes through us), increase the number of bowel movements per week, and help to soften stools to make them easier to pass.

Probiotic foods (and drinks) include fermented vegetables (like sauerkraut and kimchi), miso, kefir, and kombucha.

More research is needed when it comes to recommending a specific probiotic supplement or strain. If you’re going to take supplements, make sure to read the label to ensure that it’s safe for you. And take it as directed.

For those with autoimmune, it’s important to discuss the use of probiotics with your doctor first to make sure they are not contraindicated with the type of immunosuppressants you may be taking.


It is always a good idea to get a recommendation from someone trained in supplements versus your neighbour who is working at your local health food store.

4 - Lifestyle

Some studies show a gut benefit from regular exercise.

Ideally, aim to exercise for at least 30 minutes most days.

In terms of stress, when we’re stressed, it often affects our digestive system. The connection between our gut and our brain is so strong, researchers have coined the term “gut-brain axis.” In fact, there is an entire system called the autonomic nervous system resides in the gut and it contains more neurotransmitters than the spine!

By better managing stress, we can help to reduce emotional and physical issues (like gut issues) that may result from stress. Try things like meditation, deep breathing, and exercise.

And last but not least - make sure to go when you need to go! Don’t hold it in because that can make things worse.

Conclusion

Optimal digestion is so important for overall health. Constipation is a common problem.

Increasing our fibre and water intake and boosting our friendly gut microbes are key things we can do to help things move along.

And don't forget how lifestyle habits can affect our physical health! Exercise, stress management, and going to the bathroom regularly can also help us maintain great gut health.

Have you found that fibre, water, or probiotics affect your gut health? What about exercise, stress, and regular bathroom trips? I'd love to know in the comments below!


References:

https://www.dietvsdisease.org/best-laxatives-constipation/

https://www.dietvsdisease.org/chronic-constipation-remedies-for-relief/

https://www.precisionnutrition.com/research-constipation-fiber

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002136.htm

https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/probiotics-may-ease-constipation-201408217377

https://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/6-ways-to-enjoy-fiber-in-your-diet


#constipation #guthealth #fibre #weightloss

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DISCLAIMER: Please read the following disclaimer carefully. Vanessa Bond is not a doctor and does not diagnose or treat disease. The information on this website is not intended to replace the advice or recommendations of your primary health care provider and is not intended as medical advice. The information is intended as a complement to existing therapy - not as a substitute. The focus is to educate on how to make better decisions in order to build and maintain better nutritional balance. She and this web site encourage you to make your own health care decisions based upon your research and in partnership with a qualified health care professional.

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